ten thousand spoons

When all you need is a knife, this is not an Alanis Morissette tribute

1,134 notes

the-star-stuff:

Historical Photographs of Scientists in Love

Some couples are lucky enough to share not only their passions for one another, but their joint passion for scientific exploration. These photos, taken mostly in the first half of the twentieth century, celebrate couples who expanded our knowledge of the world together.

1. Frédéric Joliot (1900-1958) and Iréne Joliot-Curie (1897-1956) had been jointly awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1935. This photograph may have been taken in the 1940s.

2. This photograph from a 1932 handmade New Year’s greeting card shows nutritionist Annie Barbara Clark Callow with her husband, the physicist E.H. Callow, who worked at the Low Temperature Research Station and the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, Cambridge University.

3. Carnegie Museum botanist Otto Emery Jennings (1877-1964) and Grace Emma Kinzer Jennings (d. 1957). Grace Jennings was a fourth-generation Pittsburgher whose family had established one of the city’s major iron foundries. She was an assistant in botany at the Carnegie Museum, 1902-1918, when they married and she accompanied him on nearly every collecting field trip.

4. British archeologist and anthropologist Mary Douglas Nicol Leakey (1913-1996) and her husband Louis Seymour Bazett Leakey (1903-1972), 1962.

5. In this 1935 photograph, botanist Wilmatte Porter Cockerell (1871-1957) is shown with biologist Theodore Dru Alison Cockerell (1866-1948), whom she married in 1900. In 1901, he named the ultramarine blue chromodorid Mexichromis porterae in her honor. 

6. Mary Knapp Strong Clemens (1873-1965) is shown at the New York Botanical Garden with her husband, Joseph Clemens (1862-1936), an ordained Methodist minister who had become a U.S. Army Chaplain in 1902. While stationed in the Philippines, Mary and Joseph began collecting botanical specimens for scientists throughout the world. A

7. Odd Dahl (1899-1994) was a Norwegian adventurer who had no formal scientific training but later made great contributions to research on atomic energy. During the 1930s, Odd Dahl joined the staff of the Carnegie Institution in Washington as a member of the team developing the Van de Graff generator and later led Norway’s atomic energy program. He is shown here with his wife Anna “Vesse” Dahl.

8. Pierre Curie (1859-1906) and Marie Sklodowska Curie (1867-1934) were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1903 for discovery of the radioactive elements polonium and radium. Even today, the Curies provide inspiration for popular culture and textbook discussions of science. 

I suppose we forget that scientists are real people too. And we also seem to assume that science, culture and literature are all poles apart. However, it is evident that scientists do feel, and that maybe the three things are interwoven. 

613 notes

katcakes:

Fudgy Chocolate and Hazelnut Cake
It’s nutty, chocolatey, rich and moist. Cake or brownie, whatever you decide to call it, the name will serve it’s purpose of fulfilling the cravings of a chocoholic, AKA people like me! I love cutting into the slightly crispy top of the cake and finding a dense fudgy chocolate cake inside. Let’s face it. This cake is definitely not guilt-free. 
It’s still April! Which means that I could still bake desserts from my April edition of the Masterchef Magazine. And in a week from today, Masterchef Australia Season 4 will be starting, which is something that I’m definitely looking forward to. What a great way to celebrate than with a recipe from the magazine! 
Like all recipes I work with, I like to change things around to suit my taste (and family’s!). The original recipe uses apricots and ricotta as the decoration on the top, but I thought that was a bit out there for me so I substituted for pecans and white chocolate. If you try it with the apricots and ricotta, let me know how that turns out! 
Fudgy Chocolate and Hazelnut Cake (from the Masterchef Australia Magazine, Issue 22, April 2012)
Ingredients
75g dried apricots, halved
70g roasted peeled hazelnuts
50g dutch cocoa, sifted, plus extra to dust (I used plain unsweetened)
150g dark chocolate, finely chopped
150g unsalted butter, chopped
5 eggs, separated
220g caster sugar
60g sour cream
150g fresh ricotta
Method
Preheat oven to 160 degrees. Grease a 23cm square cake pan, then line base and sides with baking paper, extending paper beyond the rim. Place apricots in a bowl, pour over 60ml boiling water then set aside. Process nuts and cocoa in a food processor until finely ground.
Place chocolate and butter in a large heatproof bowl over a saucepan of gently simmering water and stir until melted and combined. Cool for 5 minutes.
Meanwhile, using an electric mixer, whisk egg yolks and 110g sugar until very thick and pale. 
Fold egg yolk mixture into chocolate mixture with sour cream, then stir in hazelnut mixture. In a clean bowl, whisk egg whites to soft peaks. Gradually add 110g sugar and whisk to almost stiff peaks. Fold into chocolate mixture in 2 batches, until just combined.
Pour batter into pan, then level with a spoon. Dollop over spoonfuls of ricotta in rows. Drain apricots, then scatter over the top. Bake for 45 minutes or until puffed and a skewer inserted into centre comes out with a few moist crumbs attached. Cool cake completely in pan.
Lift out using baking paper. Cut into pieces. Dust with extra cocoa to serve.
ENJOY! :D 

This actually sounds amazing. I cannot wait for the semester to be over so I can give this recipe a try. :D

katcakes:

Fudgy Chocolate and Hazelnut Cake

It’s nutty, chocolatey, rich and moist. Cake or brownie, whatever you decide to call it, the name will serve it’s purpose of fulfilling the cravings of a chocoholic, AKA people like me! I love cutting into the slightly crispy top of the cake and finding a dense fudgy chocolate cake inside. Let’s face it. This cake is definitely not guilt-free. 

It’s still April! Which means that I could still bake desserts from my April edition of the Masterchef Magazine. And in a week from today, Masterchef Australia Season 4 will be starting, which is something that I’m definitely looking forward to. What a great way to celebrate than with a recipe from the magazine! 

Like all recipes I work with, I like to change things around to suit my taste (and family’s!). The original recipe uses apricots and ricotta as the decoration on the top, but I thought that was a bit out there for me so I substituted for pecans and white chocolate. If you try it with the apricots and ricotta, let me know how that turns out! 

Fudgy Chocolate and Hazelnut Cake (from the Masterchef Australia Magazine, Issue 22, April 2012)

Ingredients

  • 75g dried apricots, halved
  • 70g roasted peeled hazelnuts
  • 50g dutch cocoa, sifted, plus extra to dust (I used plain unsweetened)
  • 150g dark chocolate, finely chopped
  • 150g unsalted butter, chopped
  • 5 eggs, separated
  • 220g caster sugar
  • 60g sour cream
  • 150g fresh ricotta

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 160 degrees. Grease a 23cm square cake pan, then line base and sides with baking paper, extending paper beyond the rim. Place apricots in a bowl, pour over 60ml boiling water then set aside. Process nuts and cocoa in a food processor until finely ground.

  2. Place chocolate and butter in a large heatproof bowl over a saucepan of gently simmering water and stir until melted and combined. Cool for 5 minutes.

  3. Meanwhile, using an electric mixer, whisk egg yolks and 110g sugar until very thick and pale.

  4. Fold egg yolk mixture into chocolate mixture with sour cream, then stir in hazelnut mixture. In a clean bowl, whisk egg whites to soft peaks. Gradually add 110g sugar and whisk to almost stiff peaks. Fold into chocolate mixture in 2 batches, until just combined.

  5. Pour batter into pan, then level with a spoon. Dollop over spoonfuls of ricotta in rows. Drain apricots, then scatter over the top. Bake for 45 minutes or until puffed and a skewer inserted into centre comes out with a few moist crumbs attached. Cool cake completely in pan.

  6. Lift out using baking paper. Cut into pieces. Dust with extra cocoa to serve.

ENJOY! :D 

This actually sounds amazing. I cannot wait for the semester to be over so I can give this recipe a try. :D

Filed under food cake brownies YUM

0 notes

so whilst i’m super determined to get my essays done today… here’s another procrastination moment…
mainly because there hasn’t been a photo of my face on here in months.so here is my face from a ceilidh i went to a few weeks ago. i actually look relatively normal. i’m so proud.
NOW, ONWARDS WITH THE ESSAYS! 

so whilst i’m super determined to get my essays done today… here’s another procrastination moment…

mainly because there hasn’t been a photo of my face on here in months.
so here is my face from a ceilidh i went to a few weeks ago. i actually look relatively normal. i’m so proud.

NOW, ONWARDS WITH THE ESSAYS! 

Filed under photo ceilidh drunk procrastination prose writing

24 notes

Laughter is not at all a bad beginning for a friendship, and it is far the best ending for one.

The Picture of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde (via goldenreel)

you all know how much i loved Dorian Gray, it did eventually bring a tear to my eye.
on a side note, laughter is not a bad place for love to begin, and in all honesty, it wouldn’t be a bad place for it to end either. oh Oscar, how relevant you are in the modern day.

(via commesdesenfantes)

Filed under procrastination prose english literature oscar wilde